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Auto Insurance: What’s Inside The Paperwork?

Your Auto Insurance has six main parts

Part A: Liability Coverage

Part B: Medical Payments Coverage

Part C: Uninsured Motorists Coverage

Part D: Coverage for Damage to Your Auto

Part E: Duties after an Accident or Loss

Part F: General Provisions

Woah, what? Let’s break it down.

Part A: Liability

This is how much the Insurer will pay out for any damage you as the insured become legally responsible for. Most of these have Split Limits, and Example of which would be 250/500/100

These three numbers show how much the insurance company pay for what damages.

The first number is bodily injury coverage per person maximum, the second is maximum amount coverage for bodily injuries per accident and the third is property damage.

For 250/500/100 that means $250,000 in coverage per person, up to $500,000 total per accident, and up to $100,000 in property damage; Remember that these are only for amounts you as the insured are liable for.

If you are on the policy, you are insured, plus your family, plus anyone you legally allow to use the vehicle. This is why it’s often beneficial to consider a temporary insurance policy on a vehicle for another to use it, so your insurance isn’t liable if they get in an accident.

Part B: Medical

Within 3 years of an accident, insurance companies promise to cover medical and funeral expenses caused by the accident. Surgery, Dental, X-Rays, etc, can be covered here. There are limits, some place a limit of $1000 per person, others could be $10,000. This coverage is specifically for the insured person being injured. This wouldn’t be like Coverage A, where the company is paying for your damages to others, this is for damage to you and your family.

This is regardless of fault, so even if you are found at fault, you will still get this coverage on your policy.

Part C: Uninsured/Underinsured Motorists Coverage

If you get hit by another vehicle, and it’s found to be their fault then you’re fine, right? What if they have no coverage. Remember that Coverage A only is your fault to others. The point of Uninsured Motorist Coverage is that if another person hits you without insurance, your insurance company will pay for your coverage. In some states, the percentage of drivers that are uninsured can be as high as 20! (Insurance Research Council, Recession Marked by Bump in Uninsured Motorists, News Release, April 21, 2011)

The maximum amount for these is frequently the same as your Part A coverage , but your policy can say differently.

Part D: Damages to your Auto

This is the part of your policy that says “Collision” and/or “Comprehensive” coverage.

Collision: This is when your car overturns on icy roads, or you find your car fender dented after a grocery trip. These are paid no matter who is at fault.

Comprehensive: Seperated from collision because some don’t want to pay for collision insurance, a comprehensive need is when there is a fire, theft, riot, or windstorm. Additionally this covers damages for riots, for a bird or animal breaking your car, flood and hail, or an earthquake damaging your vehicle.

Part E: Your Duties

This part in your insurance policy explains what you are required to do to obtain your coverages. There are some things you should do, like call an ambulance, the police, and get the other drivers information, but requirements from insurance companies may include: Not admitting fault, Notify your insurance company within a certain time limit, cooperating with their investigation, sending in legal paperwork in a timely manner, taking a physical exam, authorizing the insurer to obtain your medical records, and taking reasonable actions to protect your vehicle from further harm after the initial accident.

Basically, you need to cooperate with your insurance, or they aren’t required to cover your losses. That’s why a lot of online companies are harder to get coverage from, because they aren’t your personal advocate that you know or have met. It’s always nice to get auto insurance from someone you’re able to contact freely, and whom you honestly feel you can trust.

Part F: General Provisions

Provisions are details about your policy that include the ways you and your insurer can end your policy and also endorsements for your policy.

A policy has 4 ways of being ended.

  • Cancellation: simply return your policy and give a written notice that you’re done, the insurer can cancel a policy too within 60 days of giving it and giving you a 20 day notice. After 60 days they can cancel your policy if you haven’t paid, have had your license suspended or revoked, or you were deceitful in any way on your application.
  • Nonrenewal: at the end of your coverage period, the insurer can decide to not renew your policy.
  • Automatic: at the end of each insurance period, if the insurer renews, but you don’t accept the renewal, then your policy will automatically end.
  • State rules: many individual states have laws that change up the first 3, or extend time periods for renewals. It’s important to check your state laws for specific auto policy termination rules.

Endorsements are modifications to your policy. The most common being a motorcycle endorsement. Many companies adjust how much physical coverage they will have, or will have huge premiums they will only reduce when you remove or change certain coverages on a motorcycle.

To get your information simply call your auto insurer and request your coverage information. Tell them you want to see all the endorsements, riders, and Parts A-F of your insurance, and not just the fact sheet, though that can be simple and helpful too.

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