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Visions Part 3: Brain to Paper – 3 Places to Start

“How about… idea streaming? Like when you have this massive goal in mind but no idea how to get there. How to break it down into achievable components.” – Athena M.

Idea Streaming: From Brain to Paper

Thanks Athena!

Some of you have emailed me telling you that you don’t even know where to start with getting your ideas from mind to paper. We need that vision statement! You have sent me so many wonderful visions. Here are 3 ideas that I’ve personally used to write my vision statement.

1) Personal Relationships!

A good place to start is with those who you know well, whom you trust, and family members. Try to ask them these types of questions:

“What are some things I’ve always been good at?”
“What careers do you see me working in?”
“How do I communicate with people?”
“What is my biggest strength?”
“What’s the dumbest thing you’ve ever seen me do?”
“Why can’t I become a professional Oreo eater?”

And why not ask yourself some questions, nothing is more personal than yourself.

Think of your Core being:
What is your purpose?
How will you find peace in life?
What are things that really amaze and inspire you?
What do you always enjoy, even when you’re tired?
What do you believe is possible for you?
What is your biggest limiting belief?
If you left tomorrow forever, what what you have wanted to do today?
Here are a few question lists to get you thinking:

Get To Know Yourself: 29 Questions to Discover the Real You

20 Questions to Know Yourself Better and Unlock the Immense Potential Within

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2012/08/06/5-ways-to-get-to-know-yourself-better/

http://tinybuddha.com/blog/getting-to-know-yourself-what-you-like-and-what-you-want-in-life/

2) Think Categories and Goals

This is my favorite way to do things.
I organize things into 5 categories

1) Physical (Food/Exercise)
2) Emotional (Relationships/Feelings)
3) Spiritual
4) Educational (Learning/ Occupational)
5) Financial

If you consider these 5 categories and where you want to be with each one, or where you can improve, or skills you already have in that area, you can learn alot.

3) Tests!

Okay, So maybe I lied. This is my favorite. I’ve taken sooooo many personality tests. I loved the ones in 8th grade that would say, “You could be a great Accountant or Firefighter.”

Here are some of my FAVORITE personality tests:

Myers&Briggs Test: I’m an ENFP (Extrovert, Intuition, Feeling, Perceiving), But I score really close to a Thinker (instead of a Feeler). I’m basically 100% on Extrovert.

ColorCode Test: I’m a Yellow: I inject shots of enthusiasm and optimism. I’m charismatic, spontaneous, and sociable. (Pretty much everyone loves me. It’s a fact: look it up)

Strengths Finder 2.0: see your top skills: I’m an Includer (Involve EVERYONE), Maximizer (Make pieces better), “Woo” (I want people to like me), Ideation (breaking down ideas into pieces), Communication (I tell people things). You can see this influence my vision statement. This test also comes with 3 sections: 1) awareness, 2) Application: with 10 action items for each, 3) Achievement: Quotes and what success sounds like for each of your top skills.

HowToFascinate: This is a great test that gives you some adjectives that describe you along with  a primary and secondary “Advantage”. I’m a Trendsetter: Innovation and Prestige are my “Advantages”. Cutting edge, Elite, Progressive, Imaginative, Edgy. This test, for a price, can give you pages of data about power words, how to explain yourself, and ways to utilize that in a business sense.

Culture Index (INC): I don’t know where to find this test, but I took one when I applied for a job and was emailed a printout of it. It gave me an ABCD score, an EU score, and an LI score which I have no idea what is. This test talks about how you work with individuals and companies. “Self-Reliant, Initiator, Effective with Setting my own priorities, quick paced and likes to handle problems right when they arise even if it means multitasking…” and other valuable information.
My favorite gem is this: “Prefers to delegate the completion of tasks to others, but is capable of limited attention to detail.” This is true! I start 100 things and finish 12 of them… and get my little sister to finish 4 of them, my brother to do 3, and my roomate to do 6 more. The rest are forgotten and eventually dumped into the pit, like in the movie “Inside Out”.

DISC: I’m an Influencer- I like to collaborate and dislike being ignored in teams and groups. There are four types: Dominance, Influence, Steadiness, Conscientiousness. This provides insights in how you work with team.

These tests are vital in crafting out information about yourself. Did I miss any? Let me know if there are others you like, and I’ll update this list.

Last Thoughts

An online place to organize your thoughts like Mindmeister or another website could be great for organizing or laying out your thoughts. It’s a difficult task, but is worth it. then, make that vision board, write that personal vision statement, and utilize them daily to accomplish you.

why?

Because knowing yourself and your goals is the first step in getting your money to work properly. It’s also they key to happiness. When your Money and your Dreams align, you will be happy.

Please feel free to share your thoughts, your vision board, your vision statement, or your test results for any of these tests! Maybe I’ll feature you on my website or in an article (with permission of course).

Happy Financing!

-Jacob Brad Johnson
The Financial Ginger

OnACouch
Drive a couch down the street! #GoalAccomplished
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Personal Vision: Part 2 – Vision Boards

Your Vision is in hand, but now what do you do with it? This is how to take your vision from paper, to action items.

Money is important. But your “why” behind your money is almost more important. Infact, It is more important.

I want money for a few reasons, I want to provide for a family I hope to have, I intend to use money to create a foundation to increase financial literacy in Utah, I want to be involved in Scouting and christian missionary work. There are reasons to the money. “Money for the Sake of Money” isn’t happiness. As I talked about in an earlier article, Experiences bring happiness, not “Plastic Crap”.

Many friends of mine have come to me asking, “How do you figure out what you want to do?”

Here is my answer.

How I Chose Financial Planning

I went to a small school, graduated from high school with an associate’s degree, then moved to Brigham Young University (BYU) studying Computer Science. I thought it was what I loved. My whole family works in computers, Dad, Brother, Little Brother. I’m different. During 2 years as a service missionary and proselyting minister for Jesus Christ to the wonderful people of New Zealand, I learned a thing or two about myself. This insight is a blessing. Jacob Johnson is a people man, he loves working with people, helping them, teaching them, breaking down their big ideas into pieces, which he then builds up into good points. Ideation, Maximzation, Includer, Communication, “Woo”-factor. When I jumped back into school, the answer wasn’t computer science. Quick talks with people sent me to try global supply chain management, marketing, and financial planning. Marketing people I interviewed all hated what they did, unless they were in charge of their work or ran their own firm. Supply chain was awesome except I don’t want to travel 6-10 months a year, not in the ropes for having a family. My old ballroom dance partner’s father was a financial guy. He loved his job. Dude from my girlfriends work did finances. Loved his job. Everyone I talked to that worked in financials loved what they did. Private firm, big company, RIA, Broker/Dealer, Insurance agents, 9 co-workers, 1 co-worker, 80 co-workers. They each loved it. They also did what I thought was great. They taught, they did technical work, they moved around, they left the office to visit and help, they weren’t stagnant, they were involved in the community, they were happy fun loving people; the people around them were happy.
The signs were enough. I knew where I belonged. So, I packed up from BYU and moved over to Utah Valley University (UVU) where tuition was $20 more expensive and the Financial Planning program has topped the charts since it’s been around with three times as many students as any other program in the U.S. only 400.

Gainz
This Should Be On Every Vision Board

How a Vision Board Got Me There

I’ll be honest, My vision was in pieces on my phone, in my wallet, papers on my desk, notes in other odd places, bits of my memory. AKA it was a disaster. I finally straightened out my vision board.

Purpose of a Vision Board

Vision boards connect actions with goals. Sometimes we are doing the right things, but it’s getting us no-where because it isn’t connected to our vision. Sometimes we have a vision, but no actions connected. The vision board is the intersection. It’s a logically and conveniently placed object that contains our current dreams and goals.

Daily as you consider the actions you will take, consider your board. Do they align with your goal? If not, 1) remove it from your to-do list, 2) add a new goal to your vision board, 3) do it anyways and wonder why you’re still where you’re at.

Nightly as you review what you’ve done. Consider your progress on your vision. Did your actions connect? Do you need to adjust any of your dreams?

Basically, the vision board removes waste, and focuses your efforts. Efficiency.

Creating A Vision board

Remember your vision statement you made in A Personal Vision? Whip that bad boy out, and read it. I’d recommend making reading your final vision statement daily as part of your confidence building routine. That should be a good base to start off. What is written on that that ties to things you want to achieve. Is a degree part of that? Is starting a company, changing industries, going to the gym, starting a blog, selling to 20 new clients, getting 3 computer monitors, etc on that?

Consider 5 areas:

  1. Financial – Where is my money going, how will I make it, how will I manage it.
  2. Physical – Fitness, eating, outdoor activities
  3. Social – Friendships, spouses, old friends, building a business network
  4. Emotional –
  5. Intellectual – reading books, developing your business skills, utilizing your brain, how do you waste time on your phone.

Also, Consider your Big Rocks. What are your responsibilities and titles? Parent, CEO, Small Business Consultant, Teacher, Brother, Minister, Soccer Coach, Student, ETC. What are the big visions you have for them?

Where to put it

It goes wherever you will see it the absolute most. Mine is right by my bed. Blue tape boarder, with pictures taped inside it. Maybe it needs to be in the kitchen on the fridge, or by your front door (though it can be hard to make it personal there)

Vision Board - Draft #1
An Early Version of My vision boards – Painters Tape and Photos

Areas of My Board – Money Gets Everywhere!

Now you might say, Jacob. This isn’t financial. YES IT IS. If you don’t have mastery of your vision and actions, you will never have control of your finances. It doesn’t make a difference if you make $25,000, or $250,000. I know people in both who are millionaires, I know people in both who still live paycheck to paycheck.

Every single task I do that makes me money is somehow connected to my vision board. That’s how simple it is.

Control your actions, create your vision. Utilize it daily. Happiness will ensue.

Share with me a picture of your vision board, or a copy of your vision statement and I’ll feature it in an article! Email me on my contact page or Here

-Jacob Johnson

Jacob is a crazy Vision Board wielder who also dabbles with small business review software, and financial counseling at UVU. He is an avid supporter of financial education and loves to work with event groups to get finances incorporated. Want me to speak or teach a class? Ask me Here

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A Personal Vision

The Realization

I cracked open a new self-help book, excited to read and learn the mysteries of sesquipedalianism and profundity.

When I read this,

“While we’re discussing self-help books, we wanted to mention a study… [asking if] ‘The Power of Positive Thinking”… [is] a real phenomenon?…
The Results? People with high self-esteem… were more optimistic… but participants with low self-esteem who intoned those five words” (I am a lovable person) “felt less optimistic than those who didn’t…
People with a negative self-image are reinforced in that belief when they try to will their way out of it.

-Belsky, G., & Gilovich, T. (1999). Why smart people make big money mistakes–and how to correct them: Lessons from the new science of behavioral economics. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.

Like many of you, I have my own worries and things that I deal with. I’ve experienced that desire to no longer be where I am. In minor ways, I’ve had times where I’ve felt no matter what I’m doing, It’s not good enough. Self-Help books that teach us about how we use time poorly, or manage money in odd ways, or anything won’t help us if we don’t help ourselves!

But enough of that! I’m a positive guy with a talent for including people! So this exercise is for everyone to do, to know YOU better.

Vision Pitching

I was reading from a book called “To Sell is Human – The Surprising Truth About Moving Others” by Daniel H. Pink. He talks about creating sales pitches, but I think its high time to create a personal vision pitch.

* NOTE* this is my personalized version, you can get  the original version at http://www.danpink.com/pitch
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Let Go of the Ground in Vision

A vision is supposed to be the tone and aura you carry with you, representing what your theme of life is, where you’re headed, your dream, you passion, and your love. You are not who you think you are; you’ll find that out as you clarify your vision with others. The reality is that you are more than anything you can imagine with more power than you think. Ponder these questions before starting the vision:

Where do I see myself tomorrow?

What will I be working on in 5 years?

How will I be serving those around me in 20 years?

What will people say about me in 30 years?

How much time will I spend on my passions in 40 years? What is the passion you thought about when you answered that question?

Now that that you’re ready, remember this is practice not permanent. The last thing to do right before reading and starting this next bit is to physically move yourself! Would you feel comfortable with getting up and moving to somewhere you never go and then start. It is vital to be in a new or different location. Maybe you can set a timer and spend 15 minutes on it right now.

20150703_072201
Travel Away for a Minute to Refocus

Writing

Get a piece of paper, or use a writing app on your phone, and start your vision using these steps:

  1. One Word. Write as many individual words as you can that describe you. Try for 50.
  2. Question. What question do you ask yourself that makes you think deeply? What’s your question that makes others think and act? Write at least 10!
  3. Rhyme. Give a rhyme for where you’re going! What rhyme defines who you are? Write at least 10! It’s totally acceptable to google search [or ninja search] rhyme sites to help.
  4. Email. If you were to summarize your vision with a subject that would get everyone to open and read it, what would it say? Write 20!
  5. Tweet. You have 120 characters to write your vision statement, your guide to life. Write this.
  6.  Story. Read Below, and write your own.

Your try: Once upon a time ____________________________. Every day, _______________________. One day ________________________________________. Because of that, _________________________________. Because of that, __________________________________. Until finally, ___________________________________.

-Pink, D. H. (2012). To sell is human: The surprising truth about moving others. New York: Riverhead Books.

Refining

Now take your list and share it with the 5 people you know best. Ask them to remove and erase half of the remaining extras in each of your lists, until eventually you get down to you. Your Vision.

Here is Mine.

 

  1. Confidence
  2. Do you feel that way now?
  3. To feel confident, you must be cognizant.
  4. Smiling? After meeting this guy you’d better be.
  5. Worried by the future, you want peace. What’s uncertain to you? Feel confident, find your dreams with me!
  6.  Once upon a time, there was a ginger boy who loved everyone. Every day, he would laugh and smile with his family because he was confident that he was loved. One day he wasn’t so sure about what he was going to do with his life. Because of that he became very worried. Because of that he searched and learned and grew! Until finally, He was a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) who could help each beautiful person to discover and feel secure in their future.
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What It Feels Like to Share Your Vision Draft

Your statement

The last thing to do is to revise from those 6 points a paragraph, or maybe even a page. This can be detailed in statements about what you believe in, beliefs you would fight for, career paths, medium term goals, long term goals, habits you’ll pick up, habits you already have, or things that you are good at. We’ll talk more about refining the statement later.

I am a planner. When I am secure and anchored I am a blast to be around and a great communicator. Everyone is my friend and I naturally trust everyone. I’m a trendsetter seeking to push social boundaries and what is accepted to create a better experience or more learning. As a Visionary who prides himself in social engagement, I tend to be a social butterfly with friends in every group. I want everyone to like me with a ‘woo’ factor and work hard to be inclusive of every individual around me. I have a natural ability to break ideas into pieces; it is easy for me to find ways to improve a process and maximize results. I see the value in each piece. The Visionary within has come to believe in Jesus Christ and to feel the power in the principles of the Gospel with a firm desire to involve Jesus Christ in maximizing both my ability to help others, and ability to feel secure and anchored in my own life. The Analyst in me is great at counselling with others, helping them to see and create their own change, and can effectively communicate steps and processes to enrich and empower them to feel secure and plan for success. It is my choice to fight for families, fight for confidence, and involve everyone in things that will bring them security, peace, confidence, and knowledge that will improve their lives. I am Jacob. I am a family man, I am a hard worker, I am consistent, I am a networker, I am trustworthy, I am a creator, I am active, I am an empowering friend, and I am a child of God.

Send me feedback! What could be better about my dream? I know it’s already been shaved down, but it sure could use more work. Share yours here and let’s become better at sharing our visions with each other. Let go of who you aren’t and become who you want to be.

I’ll post some of your visions (with permission) if you send them to me here! Or you can email it to me directly at [email protected]

Next week I’ll share Part 2 of this series,  An Active Vision. Now that you have a vision, let’s make it happen.

-Jacob Johnson
Student of Personal Financial Planning at Utah Valley University
Expected graduation in December 2017

Pounamu- Green Stone (Jade) from New Zealand
crystalspounamu

“Ahakoa He Iti, He Pounamu”
Though it may be small, To me it is precious.

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Do You See Where You’re Going?

 

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Episode 18: NewlyWed Finances – With Dave Jacobson of CoachConnections

Episode #18 –  Newlywed Finances & Money Coaches – With Dave Jacobson



 

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Dave Jacobson HeadshotBio: Dave Jacobson, certified financial coach, enhances lives by empowering others to make better decisions with money that lead them to a financially fit lifestyle.  He has helped hundreds of individuals find financial peace through personal coaching and financial wellness seminars that focus on building and implementing a practical financial plan.

Coach Dave was nationally recognized for his personal money management expertise by The Lampo Group (Dave Ramsey’s organization) and leads Counselor Connections, a best practices group of top financial coaches from across the nation.

Show Description: Dave and I talk about marriage, finances, and some important things to do before you say “I Do”. We avoid the budgets and the numbers and focus on the thinking, actions, and understanding your partner and helping them understand you. We also delve into the value of a coach regardless of who you are, and what your

ShowNotes:

  • 0:39 – Dave Shares his history in Financial Counseling and about his personal life
  • 3:55 – Marriage: No One Tool
  • 5:15 – Communication and Unification
  • 8:00 – A mediator and guide – What a Coach is for
  • 8:40 – Areas of a healthy NewlyWed financial discussion
  • 10:50 – A Unified Vision
  • 14:15 – Dave’s Money Maxim
  • 16:56 – Starting To Talk, “As You Create:
  • 19:11 – Money is Emotional
  • 20:09 – What a Financial Coach is, Why Everyone Can Utilize One
  • 24:19 – Connecting with Coach Connections.

Money Maxim

Dave Jacobson - MoneyMaxim

Your What will only be as strong as your Why.  (This means that their passion leads, not the numbers). -Dave Jacobson

 

Contacts and Links from the Show

Here is the link to the free Guide  Free Newlywed Checklist from Coach Connections.

Coach Connection

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Ep12: Risk Management – A Military Perspective with OroTactical

Episode #12 Risk Management – A Military Perspective with ORO Tactical



Show Description: Today, I talk with Park McCumber, the CEO and founder of ORO Tactical. He was trained as a forward observer and has been stationed in Korea, Germany and more. Since his service, this man, both a Vet and active part of the guard, has started his own company, ORO Tactical, and actively uses military risk management techniques both personally and professionally. Park also gives, in the shownotes, and exclusive discount for listeners of FinancialGinger
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Park McCumber of ORO TacticalBio: After Graduating from High School in Sandy, Utah, Parker Joined the Army and served as a Fire Support Specialist in the 2nd cavalry regiment and as a Forward Observer in the 1st Cavalry division. He deployed to Kandahar Afghanistan in 2013 and is currently a Targeting NCO with the 65th Fires Brigade in the Utah National Guard. Parker is a Business Student at Utah Valley University, and the owner/operator of ORO Tactical.

ShowNotes:

The five steps of risk management

  • Identify Hazards and Risks
  • Assess Risk
  • Develop Controls / Preventative measures
  • Implement Controls
  • Monitor Risk and Controls for effectiveness

Continue reading Ep12: Risk Management – A Military Perspective with OroTactical

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Trends of The Financially Stable

Episode #10: Trends of The Financially Stable



Read more and listen more at JacobBradJohnson.com

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Today: I talk about the trends of those who are financially stable, and give you all the first taste of Jacob on a rant!

I talk about 4 trailing indicators of people who are good with their money

  • They have a vision, and a way to actively track their progress towards their goals
  • They know who they are – and can put what they want, and why they do what they do into a concise set of words
  • They make plans to increase their income
  • They incorporate their spending habits into areas of self-improvement
  • They actively progress: Spiritually/Emotionally, Physically/ Dietary, Educationally / Work Relatedly, and  Socially (Relationships too).

Do you have a plan to achieve these things?

Do you want to get better? Take action.

Join me on Facebook , and get involved in the community!

 

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Ep5: HighFivingDollars with Sarah Li Cain




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Episode #5: HighFivingDollars with Sarah Li Cain

Sarah Li Cain PhotoI had the wonderful opportunity to talk with Sarah Li Cain from HighFivingDollars.com

I love how she explains herself as a “Money Storyteller”. Storytelling runs in my blood with my mother starting the Utah Liars Contest 10 years ago, and me spending a lot of time volunteering for the Utah Timpanogas Storytelling Festival.

Hear Sarah’s story about break ups and $9000 debt, and learn some ways to be happy with your finances while working on improving your situation. Eventually, Sarah even paid for a car in cash!

Highlights

  • Sarah’s holistic approach to talking about money
  • Sarah’s adventure to Australia, which yielded a lot of money education including a pretty messy break up.
  • Dealing with self-shame about debt (and life!) in a positive way
  • Rebuilding Financial Independence after a rough patch
  • How relationships that are bad aren’t solved by money
  • How emotions affect our finances: Ego
  • How shame and guilt about bad money choices can be positive
  • About Sarah’s book “The Authentic Budget” – using your personality and values to manage your money your way.
  • A Personal Visions’ role in controlling your finances
  • Why should I budget?
  • Banishing Financial ‘Frenemies’: It’s as simple as saying “No”
  • The role of boundaries and setting expectations with others about your money

Money Maxim

Sarah Li Cain

  • Money is neutral. It’s what we do with it that matters.

Action Items

Links and Contact info from the show

HighFivingDollars.com

Ask Sarah Anything and get a Youtube answer!

Get on Sarah’s VIP list for info about her books and new ones that come out!

Her brand-new book on Amazon!

 

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Auto Insurance: What’s Inside The Paperwork?

Your Auto Insurance has six main parts

Part A: Liability Coverage

Part B: Medical Payments Coverage

Part C: Uninsured Motorists Coverage

Part D: Coverage for Damage to Your Auto

Part E: Duties after an Accident or Loss

Part F: General Provisions

Woah, what? Let’s break it down.

Part A: Liability

This is how much the Insurer will pay out for any damage you as the insured become legally responsible for. Most of these have Split Limits, and Example of which would be 250/500/100

These three numbers show how much the insurance company pay for what damages.

The first number is bodily injury coverage per person maximum, the second is maximum amount coverage for bodily injuries per accident and the third is property damage.

For 250/500/100 that means $250,000 in coverage per person, up to $500,000 total per accident, and up to $100,000 in property damage; Remember that these are only for amounts you as the insured are liable for.

If you are on the policy, you are insured, plus your family, plus anyone you legally allow to use the vehicle. This is why it’s often beneficial to consider a temporary insurance policy on a vehicle for another to use it, so your insurance isn’t liable if they get in an accident.

Part B: Medical

Within 3 years of an accident, insurance companies promise to cover medical and funeral expenses caused by the accident. Surgery, Dental, X-Rays, etc, can be covered here. There are limits, some place a limit of $1000 per person, others could be $10,000. This coverage is specifically for the insured person being injured. This wouldn’t be like Coverage A, where the company is paying for your damages to others, this is for damage to you and your family.

This is regardless of fault, so even if you are found at fault, you will still get this coverage on your policy.

Part C: Uninsured/Underinsured Motorists Coverage

If you get hit by another vehicle, and it’s found to be their fault then you’re fine, right? What if they have no coverage. Remember that Coverage A only is your fault to others. The point of Uninsured Motorist Coverage is that if another person hits you without insurance, your insurance company will pay for your coverage. In some states, the percentage of drivers that are uninsured can be as high as 20! (Insurance Research Council, Recession Marked by Bump in Uninsured Motorists, News Release, April 21, 2011)

The maximum amount for these is frequently the same as your Part A coverage , but your policy can say differently.

Part D: Damages to your Auto

This is the part of your policy that says “Collision” and/or “Comprehensive” coverage.

Collision: This is when your car overturns on icy roads, or you find your car fender dented after a grocery trip. These are paid no matter who is at fault.

Comprehensive: Seperated from collision because some don’t want to pay for collision insurance, a comprehensive need is when there is a fire, theft, riot, or windstorm. Additionally this covers damages for riots, for a bird or animal breaking your car, flood and hail, or an earthquake damaging your vehicle.

Part E: Your Duties

This part in your insurance policy explains what you are required to do to obtain your coverages. There are some things you should do, like call an ambulance, the police, and get the other drivers information, but requirements from insurance companies may include: Not admitting fault, Notify your insurance company within a certain time limit, cooperating with their investigation, sending in legal paperwork in a timely manner, taking a physical exam, authorizing the insurer to obtain your medical records, and taking reasonable actions to protect your vehicle from further harm after the initial accident.

Basically, you need to cooperate with your insurance, or they aren’t required to cover your losses. That’s why a lot of online companies are harder to get coverage from, because they aren’t your personal advocate that you know or have met. It’s always nice to get auto insurance from someone you’re able to contact freely, and whom you honestly feel you can trust.

Part F: General Provisions

Provisions are details about your policy that include the ways you and your insurer can end your policy and also endorsements for your policy.

A policy has 4 ways of being ended.

  • Cancellation: simply return your policy and give a written notice that you’re done, the insurer can cancel a policy too within 60 days of giving it and giving you a 20 day notice. After 60 days they can cancel your policy if you haven’t paid, have had your license suspended or revoked, or you were deceitful in any way on your application.
  • Nonrenewal: at the end of your coverage period, the insurer can decide to not renew your policy.
  • Automatic: at the end of each insurance period, if the insurer renews, but you don’t accept the renewal, then your policy will automatically end.
  • State rules: many individual states have laws that change up the first 3, or extend time periods for renewals. It’s important to check your state laws for specific auto policy termination rules.

Endorsements are modifications to your policy. The most common being a motorcycle endorsement. Many companies adjust how much physical coverage they will have, or will have huge premiums they will only reduce when you remove or change certain coverages on a motorcycle.

To get your information simply call your auto insurer and request your coverage information. Tell them you want to see all the endorsements, riders, and Parts A-F of your insurance, and not just the fact sheet, though that can be simple and helpful too.

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The Worst Financial Mistake I’ve made + 2 Keys to Consider in Going to College

So, I’m Jacob Brad Johnson, I’m a ginger, I’m a Personal Financial Planner major at Utah Valley University(UVU), but was a Computer Science major at Brigham Young University (BYU) for 3 semesters before.

High School

After I graduated High School and I applied for many schools with my 3.86 GPA and 30 ACT score, I figured it’d be a cinch to get scholarships. I wanted to go to BYU, I wanted to study computers.

4 years later, I was wrong, and the worst financial mistake of my life was made.

“Congratulations Jacob on your submission to Utah Valley University,” the letter began. Later on it exclaimed these proud words, “The University would love to extend the Presidential Scholarship to you as you attend… This scholarship is renewable each year pending academic resilience each school year”

Presidential! I looked it up, screaming with delight at what I saw. This scholarship included full tuition, books, and partial housing reimbursement ($300 a month or something, as I recall for the housing portion).
2 days later I was reading another letter from BYU, my dream school. “You have been accepted to Brigham Young University, beginning Summer of 2012,” The words jumped out at me. YES! I’m IN!
I read the rest.
Reread it.
One last time to check for errors.
There was no scholarship, no anything. Oh. wait.
Nope, nothing. I received notification via email a few days later that I’d received a $300 book scholarship per semester for being a relative of some person who’d made a large scholarship fund for his descendants. That was good. ‘good’.

You Already Know What I Did

This is the moment where you all already know what happened. “Jacob, you’re such an idiot”, “What were you thinking!” “…” or other thoughts may have passed through your head.
Here’s the kicker, I had a 1/2 tuition scholarship to anywhere in the state because of the New Century Scholarship program, for graduating High School with an Associate Degree from a University. I’d have been PAID to go to UVU.

Mistake is made. BYU was attended. Computer Science studied. After a few years I didn’t like it. It wasn’t my cup of tea. Ended up transferring. Where to?

Back to Utah Valley University, studying Personal Financial Planning, sans scholarship.

Now, Money mistakes are a super common occurence, and there are much bigger mistakes that one can make (I’m talking more than $40,000 decisions). When you make one of those, you’ll know.

Do These 2 Things Before You Choose Your University

1. Know your Major. 

If you haven’t determined your major, how will you know what school is best? BYU had a better computer science program. UVU has a better Financial Planning major. If you still aren’t sure, try going to a community college or other cheaper college. Why pay the price of the expensive colleges when you can get the undergrad cheap at your local community college? It sometimes may make sense to get your associates from a different school before going to the one you’ve chosen to attend for your bachelor’s or higher degree.

If you don’t know which major to choose, or are struggling between a few, Act on THIS article I wrote recently. Basically, its how to get the thoughts and who you are down on paper to make decisions easier and with more knowledge out loud.

2. Know your scholarships. What are the implications of attending your school of choice? How will you pay for it? UVU gave me scholarships, BYU didn’t. Do you have to take on debt, is the cost that significant.

Will your major pay for the cost of going to school?  You need to know How Much Your Degree Makes to consider how much debt you could take on if you don’t have the scholarships.

Here is what I mean: Determine how much income your major going to bring, and how much debt it’ll take. Can that justify the debt you would get from going to the more expensive school? Here are 8 majors that just don’t justify their cost.

What’s your biggest financial mistake you’ve made! Share your confession with me here or tweet it at me @FinancialGinger and I’ll make it into a post you’ll see featured on my twitter and Facebook.

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No More Resolutions: The 3 Keys of Achieving

Happy New Years Everyone!

Resolutions

I know now is the time of the year to be excited and happy about making a New Years Resolution.
“I’m gonna lose weight”
“I’m gonna start saving in my 401(k)”
“I’m going to read a book every month”
“I’m going to run every day even though its -1470 degrees outside”
And whatever other nonsense we tell ourselves once and then send into the magical air of wish-land *poof* to die a mysterious and definitely unnoticed death, because by mid-march you won’t even know your new years resolutions.

Real Goals

That’s because an unwritten goal is merely a wish. The goals that come to fruition are those that we record, monitor, and actively choose to achieve. We simply don’t take action on wishes. In Fact, According to Dr. Gail Matthews, the amount of success we have in reaching our goals nearly doubles when we create them properly.

The three  magic ingredients: Writing It Down, Commitment, and Accountability.

And even before you write it down, commit to it, or find accountability, you need to know what you want to accomplish! If you’re like most people you have the same 4 or 5 things that everyone wants, more money, more happiness, to do more fun stuff, to have less chaos, and to be more organized, but thinking why you want those, and what the purpose of accomplishing these goals when centered around your true character will make those goals that much easier to fully commit to.

VISION BOARDS – Not Resolutions

Might as well call this article Vision Boards Part 4. I’ve said it multiple times, especially in these articles get it from your head to paper,  how to write a vision statement, and utilizing a vision board, but it’s vital to learn about you. Write down whats most important to you, and then find ways to make those part of your daily actions. You’ll be happier. One way to learn more about you is through personality tests, such as the Color Code, or your HowToFascinate test.

How YOU Fascinate

HowToFascinate actually hooked me up with 100 Free copies of their basic HowToFascinate test for free! So, More than just finding your main definition and 3 or 4 characteristics, you can get some in-depth explanation of what it means to be like you are. Visit this URL and use the code “You-FinancialGinger”, until they are gone! http://bit.ly/2016YAF

Ingredient 1: Write It Down

Take some personality tests, and write that vision statement, then write down some of the goals you’re thinking of for new years. Do they even apply to what your personality tests say? Do they apply to who you are? It’s time to make the goals smart, specific, and personal. If it’s the same goal everyone else has, are you really doing it for you? Refine the list to look like you. Those you trust most can usually help to pin-point good goals.

For more science behind it, read this study about harvard students.
http://elitedaily.com/money/writing-down-your-goals/1068863/

“Harvard’s graduate students were asked if they have set clear, written goals for their futures, as well as if they have made specific plans to transform their fantasies into realities. The result of the study was only 3 percent of the students had written goals and plans to accomplish them…

After 10 years, the same group of students were interviewed again and the conclusion of the study was totally astonishing… The 3 percent who had written goals were earning, on average, 10 times as much as the other 97 percent of the class combined…

Think for a moment which group you belong to.”

(Bold, Italics, and Underlining added for emphasis)

Ingredient 2: Commitment

Commitment is a Vision Board. A super simple vision board I made was with blue painters type in a square right above my bed. I would draw or print pictures related to my goals with a word or 2 to explain it. I tape that picture inside the square and I’m now committed to achieving it.
Some of the goals came to fruition, I move them either to the trash, or to an accomplishment site on my wall, and some of them I end up not finishing or continuing either due to a change in priorities, information or ability.

Here’s my current vision board.

You can see I have goals to get a few more computer monitors to work better, to earn my Certified Financial Planner (CFP) designation, Publish 4 articles a month, start a podcast, have a date night every week, and make sure I take time for meditation and religious studies each day.

Those awkward ones on the right of my vision board. They are they rejects. One was a failed plan with a friend to create YouTube videos, another was the idea to do a super smash brothers tournament (I’m a pretty big nerd when it comes to that game), and the last one I removed because I ended up not getting this job with a tax firm I was shooting for.

The point is, those things change, and it’s good! Because you’re a human and you change. You’ve committed and worked toward the goal until you either a) accomplished it, b) changed your vision, or c) Lost the desire to finish it. I’m sure some goals we want aren’t being worked on, and we still certainly desire to accomplish them! Get them on the vision board. Commit to it.

Ingredient 3: Accountability

Everyone hates having a personal trainer, or a gym buddy; let me tell you – IT WORKS. When you have an accountability partner, someone who you must report to, you get to work on it much more effectively than not. Why else do you show up to work at a specific time the boss sets? It’s because if you want to get paid, you have to work for that specific time and you report to someone to prove it.
If you want your goals to be the same, then get someone you report to.

I’m accountable to readers to publish an article every week, I have people who I’m setting up to interview on my podcast that hold me accountable. My mates Andrew and Matt are my gym accountable people (and they keep on texting me every Tuesday and Thursday when I don’t show up. I love you guys!). Without them, I wouldn’t have gone to the gym nearly as much as I have. In-fact, our trainer showed me through my fat levels and weight gain that since going to the gym I’ve put on at least 5 lbs of muscle in 3 months.

If you don’t have an accountability partner, get one.

If you need one, get me. Email me! I’ll be your accountability partner for a few weeks until you find another. Here’s my personal email: [email protected] Put Accountability in the title and I’ll help.

This year, lets not make resolutions that we wont remember by march. Instead: Make a vision, Write your dreams down, Commit by putting it on the vision board, and Get the Accountability partner.

-TheFinancialGinger

  1. http://www.dominican.edu/dominicannews/study-highlights-strategies-for-achieving-goals
  2. http://elitedaily.com/money/writing-down-your-goals/1068863/
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The Ultimate Cost Saver in College: 4 steps

My father during his last semester of college told my mom, “Wait… I don’t want to major in business. I want to be a chef”.

Needless to say, he didn’t go to chef school. Many of us spend years bouncing around in majors of college and end up with all this needless classwork.

This is the key to saving both Time and Money in college.

Get the Right Major the First Time

This is easier than it sounds. First, you need a vision. If you don’t have one, use this nifty little template. (Jokes, that’s a link to my article about writing a vision statement)

But seriously, the most important thing in deciding your major is knowing who you REALLY are. Who are you? What makes you tick? Figure that out.

Here’s the process:

  1. Lists about you
  2. Interviews
  3. Comparison Charts
  4. Have 1 “figure-it-out” semester

This is the process I used to break into my major quickly. The reason it’s so good in saving you money is because of the time you spend going to college. Sure, earning a couple scholarships for $400 or $500 a piece is great, but if you can go to school for 2 semesters less because you didn’t change a major, then you just saved 2 semesters of tuition which is average about $9-10,000 dollars.

Here is, The Ultimate Cost Saver in College.

Step 1: Lists

List out 20 majors you’re interested in.

List out 20 Jobs you could enjoy doing.

It’s important to get to a larger number, so you really consider things you actually enjoy. Everyone is able to find 3 or 4 things they like, but can you get 20? Narrow it down to a top 5. Maybe a trusted friend, or therapist, or coach, or school counselor could help you narrow the list down a bit.

My Step 1: I was deciding what I wanted to do with my life after finishing a 2 year service mission in New Zealand.  The starting list included skills with dancing (I was a 4th place Titleist in Youth-American-Smooth at BYU Nationals in Ballroom in 2013), a love for computers, good conversational skills (I hope), loving people, loving group interactions, breaking ideas into pieces, loving competition and other factors. It was easy to identify event planning, financial services, and global supply chain management as 3 possible majors, among others.

Step 2: Interviews

Find people in each industry that you know (or don’t!) and interview them. This is cake. Ask people on social media, google companies that work in that industry, it’s not too hard to find someone. Most respectable people will give you 15 minutes to interview them.

You need good questions: Here is a basic list:

What makes your job worth it?

How did you end up working in this industry?

How much do people get paid working in your industry?

How do you help people?

What are the best certifications or skills to learn success?

What personality types work well in this industry?

How do you get into the industry running fast?

Is this a 40 hour a week job? How much time do you need to invest to achieve excellence?

Interviewing  5 people in each industry will give you a good way to benchmark what they enjoy, pros and cons, income levels, what they hate, skills they utilize frequently, career path and progression, and other little details you want to know.

My Step 2: After calling up a few old friends, and posting on Facebook about wanting to talk to professionals in these areas (in separate posts on different days. Posting a list of things on Facebook gets zero responses. and you want more than zero), I was able to interview a few event planners, financial planners, and a few supply chain management experts. The leader of my service mission (over 200+ of us missionaries) was a supply chain expert for UPS during his working days, my old dance partners father is a financial planner, and a man from my church back home is a very successful event planner. This grew into more interviews. My Girlfriend sent me to the finance guy for her company at a local Edward Jones branch. My interviews grew and grew and I really learned the good, the bad, and the ugly of each industry.

Step 3: Compare

If you’ve read many of my articles, you’ve probably seen that I often say “Ask your friend, boss, etc to shorten down this list with you.” or “Ask your friend if that’s really you”.

Same here! Ask people what they think, and maybe make a weighted list or pros and cons for each, then weight how important that is to you. Then you can almost make a weighted average of how important it is.

My Step 3: I didn’t make a weighted list for this (Such a Hypocrite, ae?) but I’ve done this with many projects. Deciding where to spend money, choosing to live at home or live on my own during college, If I should paint my room blue on the top half or blue on the bottom half, and other ‘very important’ decisions, or less important decisions.

 Step 4: It’s okay to have a “Figure-it-out” semester

Maybe it’d be good to take one semester and take 1 or 2 classes in each major you’ve picked. It’s also a great time to talk to counselors and teachers and continue working on clarifying step 3 (compare) and spend more time on step 2 (interviews).

Realize that rushing through college isn’t fun. There are scholarships you can get while in school, there are lots of governmental aid that you can get, and there is college life. Do you really want to be out of school in the big world at 21? Consider studying abroad, finding side hustle opportunities, start a business, do something epic during school time. Summer is the opportunity to work at a hotel in Alaska, work on a fishing boat on the sea, working in hospitality in Australia, or building up certifications, skills, and hobbies that can contribute to your overall balance in life.

Remember,

Lists, Interviews, Comparison tables, and Take a semester to figure it out.

Jacob Johnson

The Financial Ginger

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Money and Happiness: Experiences VS “Plastic Crap”

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Artist: Crystal Johnson

Have you ever had the thought, “I wish I had something to look forward to!”? When that thought occurs, what are you really wishing for? Are you hoping for a fun experience, or are you hoping for a new toy?

A Trait of Happy People

Happy people buy experiences, not objects. “[A] wandering mind is an unhappy mind.”[1] Throughout your life, people will say anything to get you to buy their product. They try to lure you in by telling you their product is the latest trend, or the item most worth your money. When these thoughts come, remember that your money is your tool to living the life that you want to live.

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Experiencing Dinosaurs: I’m the Kid in the Blue Soccer Jersey

Some Professional Opinions

“If you’re a materialistic individual and life suddenly takes a wrong turn you’re going to have a tougher time recovering from that setback.”[2] Materialistic people who turn to shopping or other types of spending are “likely to [experience] even greater stress and lower well-being.”[3]

Individuals who focus their life on financial success are more likely to have problems adjusting to life and also are likely to have lower well-being.

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Klondike: Bobsled Competition for Boy Scouting
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Experiencing Canoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most Importantly, it affects our satisfaction with life. Ed Diener, Happiness expert and psychology professor at the University of Illinois said that “[materialism] is open-ended and goes on forever—we can always want more, which is usually not true of other goals such as friendship”.[4]

Basically, Spend your money where it counts. Material things are a necessity, but moderation can help you to live a more fulfilling life.

Need, Want, Luxury.

There is a simple scale called: Need, Want, Luxury. You need transportation to and from work. You want to drive a car. A luxury  for me might be to drive a 2014 Mitsubishi Mirage (okay, weak sauce, but that’s the car I want to drive. That baby gets like 42 MPG!) (Okay, it may not be a luxury topping out at about $8,000).

You may be able to fulfill your need with public transportation to work, maybe you live close enough to school or work that a bicycle will do. The Important part is that your basic needs are fulfilled.

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My Needs Are Filled: Everything Extra is Icing. Don’t Let Icing Distract You From The Cake

After that, your money is Discretionary. Carl Richards, of Behaviour Gap, asks if we really do connect what is important to us and how we spend our money.[5] What is most important to you? Why do you spend the way you do? Do your spending habits come from your community, your parents, or others? That’s probably a strong source of where your money discontentment comes from. How will you change that?

Spend money on things you value, but also on experiences. Valuable experiences can often seem to be counter-intuitive when considering the cost. I recently got a gym membership. I have a free gym at my school, It’s just as nice or nicer than the gym my membership is at. Why would I pay when I have a free gym? It’s worth paying for that membership because of the experience it is with my two childhood friends. The three of us go and have a good laugh, some good lifting, and a friendship that pays me not in money, but in physical health and friendship.

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Volunteering with Hot Air Balloons

 

DanceWBekah
   Competitive Ballroom Dance

Science and Money-Happiness

You will be happier if you spend money on things you can experience, but people “still choose to spend their money on material items because they think they’re of greater value.”[6]

Experiences have the power to make us happier. According to researcher Mr. Killingsworth,

“Minds tend to wander to dark, not whimsical, places. Unless that mind has something exciting to anticipate or sweet to remember.” Doctoral Candidate Amit Kumar’s research showed “when you can’t live in a moment, they say, it’s best to live in anticipation of an experience. Experiential purchases like trips, concerts, movies, et cetera, tend to trump material purchases because the utility of buying anything really starts accruing before you buy it.”[7]

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Boat! (Or Getting Stuck)
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 Touring New York
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Pyramid On Top of a Mountain
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Visiting an Indian Reservation
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Removing 400 Cubic Yards of a Forest at a Women’s Shelter in Gore, New Zealand

My Story

I remember being on the beach in New Zealand, standing with my Samoan friend as we watched an airplane fly directly over our head, yet again. Old bricks from houses built during the Great War scattered the seashore. This was the happiest moment of my life. My time, my effort, and my money were devoted to the experiences I wanted to create. I had decided to participate in a ministry for two years. I was a volunteer, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. I met with other ministers to try to grow religious involvement in communities, taught lessons and scripture classes with groups and in the homes of families, and actively participated in service projects – vandalism clean up, fence and trail repair, service in soup kitchens, and horseback riding lessons for the disabled were among the many service projects I participated in.

Aside from a green-stone necklace from a dear friend, a few lavalavas, and some Weetabix All Blacks collector cards, I’m not sure I have any tangible souvenirs from that experience; my memories of sitting on a beach with my Samoan friend and watching countless airplanes fly directly overhead offer me some of the greatest and happiest memories of my life.

If you’re going to devote your time, effort and money toward something, wouldn’t you rather it be an experience that may bring anticipation, excitement, and prolonged joyful remembrance? Consider that next time you’re about to buy what I call “plastic crap” or non-essential material things.

Next week I’ll talk about some techniques for crafting your own personal vision so you can start aligning your values and money and avoid the “plastic crap” mind-set.

Jacob Johnson
-Jacob is a fidget-er who is always changing things, He spends his time making vision boards, experiencing things, and perusing business cards from years ago. If you want to add to his business card collection, send him one!

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Articles:

Experiences Vs Crap Design by Crystal Johnson.

[1] Hamblin, James. “Buy Experiences, Not Things.” The Atlantic, 7 Oct. 2014, www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/10/buy-experiences/381132/

[2] Ruvio, A., Somer, E. & Rindfleisch, A. J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2014) 42: 90. doi:10.1007/s11747-013-0345-6,
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/02/materialism-health-effects_n_4344056.html

[3] Ruvio, A., Somer, E. & Rindfleisch, A. J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2014) 42: 90. doi:10.1007/s11747-013-0345-6
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/02/materialism-health-effects_n_4344056.html

[4] Diener, Ed. “6 Reasons Why People – Not Things – Will Make You Happier.” The Huffington Post, 2 December 2013, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/02/materialism-health-effects_n_4344056.html

[5] Richards, Carl. “Do Your Values Align with Your Money & Time?” Behavior Gap, 22 April, 2015, www.behaviorgap.com/do-your-values-align-with-your-money-time/

[6] “Proof That Life Experiences — Not Things — Make You Happier.” The Huffington Post, 3 April 2014, www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/03/life-experiences-happier-material-things_n_5072591.html

[7] Hamblin, James. “Buy Experiences, Not Things.” The Atlantic, 7 Oct. 2014, www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/10/buy-experiences/381132/

 

Here are A Bunch of other Experiences!