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Why you want a Certified Financial Planner, Why I don’t want to just be a “Financial Advisor”

Confidence comes through cognizance.

Now, everyone has heard the term ‘Financial Advisor’ before. However, did you know that not all terms mean what you think they mean.

Literally anyone can be a Financial Advisor. According to Investopedia,

“Financial advisor” is a generic term with no precise industry definition… What may pass as a financial advisor in some instances may be a product salesperson, such as a stockbroker or a life insurance agent. A true financial advisor should be a well-educated, credentialed, experienced, financial professional who works on behalf of his clients as opposed to serving the interests of a financial institution.

“Go to college;” I’m now a Financial Advisor by the legal definition. “Spend all your tax refunds on Pringles and Custom Baby-Seal Leather Boots;” I’m now a Financial Advisor. “Put that million dollars you inherited into this annuity;” I’m now a Financial Advisor and, depending on the company I work for, possibly $30,000 richer (assuming a 3% commission, some can be as high as 10%!).

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A well diversified Pringle portfolio
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Custom Leather Boots – Good Investment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click on this link and print your own certificate of being a certified Financial Advisor from Last Week Tonight’s Financial Advisor Academy signed by John Oliver, the Dean of Financery! That’s how easy it is to say you’re a Financial Advisor.

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Boom – My dog is a Financial Advisor

The reason I want to be a Certified Financial Planner Designee is so that those served will be confident and secure the advice they are given is for their best interest. A CFP designation requires a LOT of work. Here are some of the many requirements

  • A Bachelor’s degree
  • Mastery of 100 topics of financial planning
  • Classes and credit hours in these areas:
    • Insurance Planning
    • Employee Benefits Planning
    • Investment and Securities Planning
    • State and Federal Income Tax Planning
    • Estate Planning
    • Retirement Planning
    • Asset Protection Planning
    • Estate Tax, Gift Tax, and Transfer Tax Planning
    • Financial Counselling
    • Capstone Course
  • Passing a 6 hour test with 170 questions about the application of the 100 areas including:
    • Two case studies
    • Mini-case problem sets
    • Stand-alone questions
    • This test has about a 42% pass rate
  • 3 years of work experience in all areas
    • Establishing and Defining Relationships
    • Gather Client Data and Goals
    • Analysing and Evaluating Financial Status
    • Developing and Presenting Financial Planning Recommendations and Alternatives (yeah. you can’t give one idea, but a cluster of them)
    • Implementing the choice
    • Monitoring the Financial Plan

Oh. And there are is more. There are ongoing requirements to be a CFP Designee.

There is a strict code of ethics involving criminal background checks and compliance to track everything you do. Every two year period requires thirty hours of ongoing continuing education.

Also, you CAN’T have a CFP Certification if you’ve had any of these.

  • Felony conviction for theft, embezzlement or any other financial crime
  • Felony for tax fraud
  • Revocation of any professional license previously (with exceptions)
  • Felony conviction for any degree of murder or rape
  • Felony for a violent crime in the last 5 years.
  • Two or more bankruptcies (with exceptions)

So, except for a violent crime lasting 5 years on your record, anything else is a permanent block from ever being a CFP Designee.

Who would you rather work with on creating your financial action plan?

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CFP Designees provide the best advice

Do you understand why it’s worth looking for a CFP with all of that under their belt, compared to just a “Financial Advisor” (I hope you printed that URL off, because if so, you’re an Advisor now, too!)

My interest in studying financial planning by becoming a CFP Designee is to help individuals feel aware, secure, and prepared for retirement. The peace that comes from knowing you are acting and achieving your own goals financially is  powerful and strong that builds real confidence to act. I’m also motivated to become a CFP Designee because it is something that is universal and needed for everyone; this field is a way to help all individuals and therefore families too, no exceptions. A CFP designation gives strong support to show I can do comprehensive planning, and have dedication to providing value and accuracy.  Attendance at finance conferences, Financial Planning Association meetings, and volunteer work through my school’s student financial counselling centre, the Money Management Resource Centre, are all ways I’m becoming as knowledgeable I can for the benefit of those I will work for. Individuals need help on a vision, and then they can make the wise decision.

I want to help millennial entrepreneurs, newlyweds, dance teachers, college students, and the active high paced people of today to understand how their money works and how to keep their wealth from slipping through their fingers. People are scared of money, or worried about money. If they are cognizant then they can be confident. My goal is to become a reliable counsellor; I will be a planner to help others make educated choices to feel confident and prepared to reach their vision: bear hunting in Europe, having a large family, creating a company from scratch, or planning 40 years in advance for retirement.

– Jacob Johnson is a student of Personal Financial Planning at Utah Valley University, He is a member of the student Financial Planning Association there and enjoys competitive ballroom dance.

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– Thank you Rebekah White for the wonderful craftsmanship and help in editing and reviewing my writing. Thank you for helping me to be confident. Rebekah has a degree in Creative Writing and helps authors and individuals express their thoughts in more effective and clear methods using their own natural voice. * If you’d like contact to her please let me know!

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I Got A Credit Score!

Remember my article “Seriously, No Credit Score?” Well. Guess who got a credit score?

 

This guy did!
Despite all of the suggestions and thoughts I had, I discovered that the process was a little bit harder than expected.

The Process

First off, applying for credit isn’t as easy as you’d think, I got turned down on a credit card before I wisened up and realized I couldn’t get the best card ever because of my lack of a record. So, I applied for a secured credit card and put about $50 bucks as collateral. MasterCard gave me a $200 limit against my initial deposit, which I intend to utilize for a few things here and there, and then pay it off immediately. This will give me a revolving credit style that is beneficial.

Second, I applied for a line of credit at my credit union. They offered me $100, $200, $500, and $1000 limits, depending on how much I was willing to take on in APR. I chose the $500 option, because I know it isn’t smart to utilize more than 25% of your credit limit. I could make a significant purchase on this limit and auto-set it to pay from my checking and savings at the end of each month.

The third thing that I did was apply for a Credit Builder Loan through my credit union. I locked up $500 of my own money, and I am paying my credit union back that same $500 (it’s basically a forced savings) at the end of the year. I get my $500 back plus most of the $500 I payed them, and I’ll have an entire year of credit payments on my account.

 

Thoughts about each option:

Credit Card: This one is the most fearful for me. If I’m late on payments, or never use it, I easily lose a lot of money, $50 plus $35 (explain these amounts), and it goes on my record. I still have this card in the envelope because I accidentally delivered it to my home address while I was living in Kansas City. I recently returned home, so I intend to start using it now. Cards like this have a VERY high APR, and the first time you mess up they slap you with a fee and your APR goes even higher. If you’re gonna get a card like this, pay it off immediately and put 12 reminders on your phone, your girlfriend’s phone, and your dog’s phone (Yes these exist. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2547788/Even-Fidos-got-dog-bone-Owners-stay-contact-pooch-using-video-phone-pets.html ), and put it on Autopay if you can. (Voluntary Automation :D)

Line of credit:. This is basically the same as the credit card, but because it’s with my credit union, it isn’t as expensive, and it’s linked to my account, meaning they have it on Autopay for the entire amount (or just a percentage if I so choose. Which I don’t.) I might act a little bit intense, but I’m big on not spending more money than I have.

The biggest pitfall with having a line of credit is feeling that you are able to live outside your means. If you do that, and only pay the minimum required payments, you are stuck paying huge interest on your credit cards. If you remember from previous articles, you should have an accountability partner who you can use to keep you from overspending.

Credit Builder Loan: This one is easily my favorite. It’s so simple that only took 15 minutes because it was through my bank . It’s super cheap,  you pay monthly and put it on auto-pay. I can pay early if I want or can pay off the entire balance at any time. The total cost to do this for an entire year is about $35 dollars.

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My actions moved my score from zero to… almost hero

The Results:

Now on to the powerful part. I got myself that credit score. First credit scores are never amazing, and they have a lot of weak points. For example, my score shows that I only have 1  month of history reported. It shows that I have 5 or 6 inquiries onto my accounts. It’s also through Credit Karma, so it’s got some slight sway depending on what I want to use the credit for (http://www.goodfinancialcents.com/how-to-find-your-real-fico-credit-score-free/ Jeff Rose Has a good article about some issue with getting credit scores like this)

He explains in his article that he found his score in the 750’s, and went through a huge process to find a real credit score. After that, his intern figured out his score, and it was low 600’s, but he had no credit cards or credit history.

My issue is the same. I have 1 credit card, 1 loan, and 1 line of credit. Because of that I have a low number of accounts, my average open length of an account is very low, and the amount of hard inquiries that I’ve had in the last few months shows to be 3 for my credit scores. These can be bad signs and reduce my score.

BUT I HAVE A SCORE!

There we go! 669 and 664. 2 of the 3 credit bureaus.

What’s your story about your credit history? Share in the comments below!

 

 

-Jacob Brad Johnson is a Personal Financial Planning student at Utah Valley University who enjoys board games, West Coast Swing dancing, and helping his friends to save money on taxes. He strives to become a Certified Financial Planner designee and help the world to live their dreams and retire with confidence.

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Shout out to Briana! Thanks for helping to edit and reformat this article!

-Briana Beers graduated from BYU with a degree in English and editing. She’s currently a stay-at-home mom who moonlights as an editor in her rare spare time. When she’s not chasing her kids or cleaning three week old food splatters off the light switches, she enjoys reading, baking, and spending time with loved ones.

 

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So, I started a Website Today (Welcome to my site!)

Today was a typical Saturday. Slept in, tried to cook something but ended up eating nutter butter’s instead. Complained to my girlfriend about how fat I am. Tried to read that book for the fifth time but haven’t actually cracked the cover.

But, Here I go.

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The purpose of this website is so people can see what I can offer for them. You need to think, what is this guy all about? He is alive and knows things, but what things does he know?

I’m going to show you a bunch of knowledge that stays in my head that can move to your head! Hopefully we’ll both be the better for it.

Catch my Resume page to see some things about me, where School is, home is, certifications, goals, aspirations, that weird business I started as a kid, and maybe I’ll even get descriptive about that weird mostly faded birth mark on my upper left thigh, who knows.

Hopefully this will become a growing resource of financial tools and thoughts you can use to navigate your personal journey. Perhaps this is for an employer scoping out to see if that tall red head could produce value. This website is the tool for you.

If you don’t find what you need, please. email me at [email protected] or give me a text at my personal number (801) 500-8710.

I want to create the tools and resources you need to be financially successful, so if you want to know something. I will find the answers for you, or I will die trying

Sincerely,

 

Jacob Brad Johnson

-Student of Personal Financial Planning, Utah Valley University
-Expected class of December 2017,
-Planned to sit for CFP Certification March 2018
-Committee of UVU Financial Planning Association (FPA) Student Chapter
-Lover of Ballroom Dance and West Coast Swing