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How a Late 2017 Interest Rate Increase Might Impact Your Finances

interest rate impact

Guest Post: By Patty Moore, a blogger who writes about personal finance, careers, and family. You can follow Patty on Twitter @WorkMomLife.

In the United States, interest rates are controlled by the Federal Reserve Bank. It controls a key interest rate, the Fed Funds Rate, that banks charge each other to borrow money. Changes to the Fed Funds Rate ripple through the economy and can directly affect your finances. That’s why so much attention is paid to forecasting any upcoming changes to the Fed Funds Rate.

The Federal Reserve meets six times a year to consider the Fed Funds Rate, and the next meeting is in December. At the most recent meeting, in September, the Fed indicated that it will raise the Fed Funds Rate by one-quarter of 1 percent in December. It bases these decisions on various economic conditions. One is inflation – the general rise in prices across the economy. The Fed fights high inflation, and raising interest rates is an important tool. Note that the Fed anticipates inflation before it actually occurs to get an early jump on the fight against it.

Inflation and Interest

Inflation occurs when the economy overheats and shortages in materials and/or workers develop. Shortages force companies to bid up the amount they’ll pay to workers and suppliers in order to compete with each other. These increases show up in the prices of things you buy, and also in your take-home pay.

Raising interest rates will slow down inflation, because borrowers have to pay more interest when they borrow. That leaves less money left over to pay higher, inflated prices and therefore slows down the economy, which slows down inflation.

So, when the Federal Reserve see signs that the economy is threatening to overheat and raise the inflation rate, it boosts the Federal Funds Rate to slow everything down.

Impact on Borrowers

As we said, a change in the Fed Funds Rate ripples through the economy, because lenders have to pay more interest on the money they borrow in order to lend it out. Therefore, rates will increase on new credit cards, mortgages, car loans, personal loans. If you have borrowed money at a variable interest rate – that is, at a rate that can change over time – then you can expect to pay more interest charges. Most credit cards are variable rate, so a higher Fed Funds Rate should show up shortly on your credit cards’ monthly billing statements. More of your hard-earned money must then go to paying interest on any unpaid balances. You can avoid this effect by paying off your entire balance each month, but that’s often not possible for many of us.

Existing fixed-rate loans, such as those on cars and most mortgages, aren’t affected by changes to the Fed Funds Rate, but new ones will be issued at higher rates. Existing credit cards and adjustable-rate mortgages can see rates change shortly after a Fed rate hike. You can deflect changing interest rates by refinancing variable rate debt (ex. Credit cards) into fixed rate products, see example here. Some experts suggest moving variable rate credit card debt to a fixed rate term loan during rising interest rate environments.

Private student loans frequently charge a variable interest rate. Depending on your student loan agreement, you might see a higher interest rate on your loan right away, or you might not see it for up to a year. Eventually, the higher rate takes hold and your remaining private student loan debt will cost you more money each month. Most student loans in America are made by the federal government and have a fixed interest rate that protects you from rate hikes. However, the Department of Education sets new interest rates each spring that take effect on July 1, causing new loans to be more expensive during inflationary times.

If you have any adjustable rate loans or credit cards, try to replace them with fixed-interest-rate ones when rates are rising. Also, try to pay off your credit cards in full each month, so that you don’t have to pay any interest at all on credit card balances.

Impact on Savers

The flip side of interest rate hikes is that savers earn more interest on their savings. Fed Fund Rate hikes might not impact the amount of interest you earn right away, because banks and other savings institutions use a “sticky” interest strategy. This means that the banks raise interest money on loans right away, but take their time passing along higher interest rates to savers. That’s unfair, but it’s also a fact of life. Eventually, competition causes banks to pay more interest on savings accounts, certificates of deposit and money-market accounts. Investors who buy Treasury bills see interest rates rise quickly on new debt in response to Fed Funds Rate hikes.

Naturally, the effects of a lower Fed Funds Rates are the opposite – good for borrowers, bad for savers. When interest rates are very low, as they had been from 2009 to 2016, it’s hard for some retirees to earn enough interest on relatively safe savings accounts and might turn to riskier sources of income, such as stocks and junk bonds. That’s unfortunate, because retirees are the least able to absorb losses, since they are no longer earning a salary or wages.

Now What:

  • The Federal Reserve is increasing interest rates in 2018.
  • If you currently have variable rate debt (ex. credit cards), plan on your interest rate and monthly payment increasing in 2018. Let this be motivation to pay down debt!
  • Fixed interest rate debt will not be impacted. Consider refinancing variable rate debt to a fixed interest rate.
  • The interest rate you receive on your savings accounts, CD’s, and money-market accounts will increase! This is good news for savers!

About The Author

Patty Moore is a single mother to one beautiful daughter while working 40 hours a week. She writes about parenting, family finances, and creating a work life balance in her blog Working Mother Life. Her hope is to help other women in similar situations to hers become better and more balanced mothers.

 

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What Recent Graduates Need to Know About Student Loan Repayment

Student Loan Repayment

Guest Post: from Dollar Diligence
For most college graduates, student loans are a fact of life.

Because the cost of a college degree has skyrocketed in recent years, student loans are necessary for a large number of students who would not otherwise be able to afford to obtain a degree.

Recent college graduates are nearing the end of what is known as the “grace period.” This is the six-month period of time after graduating or leaving school where a borrower does not have to make a payment on his or her student loans. After the grace period ends, a borrower will have to start making payments on his or her student loans.

That means that Class of 2017 graduates who received a diploma in April, May, or June, will soon receive their first student loan bills. It is critically important for these grads to understand the fundamentals of student loan repayment so they can be successful.

Learning more about student loans, including strategies for how to best pay off your loans, is vital to making informed decisions about your student loans moving forward.

Read on to learn the basics about what student loans are, your repayment options, and how you can take charge of your repayment schedule to pay them off more quickly.

 

Types of Student Loans

There are two types of student loans: federal student loans and private student loans. Federal student loans are offered by the government through the Department of Education. Private student loans are offered by private banks and lenders.

Federal student loans include both Direct Loans and Perkins Loans. With Direct Loans, the Department of Education is the lender. With Perkins Loans, the school is the lender.

There are three types of Direct federal student loans.

 

Direct Subsidized Loans

These are available to undergraduate students with a demonstrated financial need to help them pay for the cost of a degree at a college or career school. With subsidized loans, the government covers the cost of interest while the student is enrolled at least half-time in school, in a grace period, or during a period of deferment or forbearance.

 

Direct Unsubsidized Loans

Direct Unsubsidized Loans are available to undergraduate, graduate or professional students. They are similar to subsidized loans, except that students do not have to demonstrate financial need to be eligible, and students are responsible for interest on the loan.

 

Direct PLUS Loans

Direct PLUS Loans are available to graduate and professional students and to parents of dependent undergraduate students. Though the interest rates do not vary on these loans, the government will check to ensure that you do not have any serious adverse credit history before giving out the loan (such as bankruptcy).

All federal student loans have fixed interest rates, which means that the interest rate is the same for the life of the loan. The interest rate is the percentage that a bank or other lender charges you to loan you money. The higher the interest rate, the more money you will pay over time.  

 

Private Student Loans

There are two primary options with private student loans: those with fixed interest rates and those with variable interest rates. Variable interest rate loans tend to start out lower but can go up over time. Fixed interest rates are usually higher, but are more predictable.

Private student loans typically have higher interest rates and eligibility is based on creditworthiness. If a student does not have good credit or has no credit history at all, they can elect to add a cosigner to the loan who shares the responsibility of repayment.

It is always smart to max out federal student loans before taking out any private loans as they typically have fewer benefits and few options in the case of financial hardship.

 

Repayment Options

There are a number of options for repaying your student loans based on the type of student loan that you have (federal or private) and your current financial situation.

As mentioned, federal student loans are generally considered to be more favorable because they offer more generous repayment options, particularly for those struggling to meet their minimum monthly payments.

 

Income-Driven Repayment Plans

For borrowers with federal student loans, income-driven repayment plans are a good repayment option for anyone who does not currently have a high salary. This plan will cap your monthly student loan payment at a percentage of your monthly discretionary income, from 10 to 20 percent.

However, the standard federal student loan repayment term of 10 years will usually be extended around 20 to 25 years. At the end of that period, the remaining balance will be forgiven.

The benefit of an income-driven repayment plan is that it will immediately decrease the amount of money that you pay each month. However, because it extends the loan term, you will pay more in interest. You will also owe taxes on the amount that is forgiven.

 

Forbearance and Deferment

If your financial problems are temporary — for example, if you have been laid off or are suffering an illness — then you may be eligible for a forbearance or deferment of your federal or private student loans. Each of these options will put your student loans on “pause” while you cannot make payments.

For federal student loans, a deferment allows you to not make payments for up to three years. Forbearance for private student loans is available for up to 12 months. However, for both private student loans and unsubsidized federal loans, interest will continue to grow on your loan balance, which means that making this choice can result in owing more money on your student loans.

 

Student Loan Refinancing

For borrowers with multiple student loans, refinancing might be an option to help save money and reduce your interest rate. Refinancing your student loans is essentially applying for a new loan to pay off your private student loans, and if you choose, your federal student loans.

Borrowers can often obtain a lower, fixed interest rate by refinancing, which can help them save thousands of dollars in interest and pay off their loans more quickly. However, you should be aware that if you refinance your federal student loans along with your private student loans, you will lose the protections of the federal student loans, such as income-driven repayment plan options.

Refinancing requires that the borrower have a history of making on-time payments, a solid income and a credit score of at least 660.

 

Strategies for Repaying Student Loans

Paying off your student loans should be a top priority for recent college graduates, but it can be difficult to accomplish, particularly if you have a low starting salary. But by taking certain steps and working towards paying down your loans, you can achieve this goal.

Whenever possible, borrowers should pay extra money towards their student loans. This could be as little as $25 each month, or as much as $1,000. Each little bit can help to pay down the total amount owed on your student loans.  

Next, borrowers should take steps to reduce their interest rate. This can be accomplished through refinancing (described above), or often by signing up for automatic payments, or by making a certain number of on-time payments. Check with your lender to determine if they offer any incentives to reduce your interest rate.

Finally, borrowers should try to make extra payments whenever they can. A single extra payment each year can significantly reduce the total amount owed, and help you pay off your loan more quickly.

 

About The Author

Aside from his full-time job as a high school teacher, you can find Jacob blogging about personal finance, reading books about history, and figuring out which kind of puppy to get next. Follow him on Twitter to keep up with him! Or visit http://www.dollardiligence.com

 

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The Worst Financial Mistake I’ve made + 2 Keys to Consider in Going to College

So, I’m Jacob Brad Johnson, I’m a ginger, I’m a Personal Financial Planner major at Utah Valley University(UVU), but was a Computer Science major at Brigham Young University (BYU) for 3 semesters before.

High School

After I graduated High School and I applied for many schools with my 3.86 GPA and 30 ACT score, I figured it’d be a cinch to get scholarships. I wanted to go to BYU, I wanted to study computers.

4 years later, I was wrong, and the worst financial mistake of my life was made.

“Congratulations Jacob on your submission to Utah Valley University,” the letter began. Later on it exclaimed these proud words, “The University would love to extend the Presidential Scholarship to you as you attend… This scholarship is renewable each year pending academic resilience each school year”

Presidential! I looked it up, screaming with delight at what I saw. This scholarship included full tuition, books, and partial housing reimbursement ($300 a month or something, as I recall for the housing portion).
2 days later I was reading another letter from BYU, my dream school. “You have been accepted to Brigham Young University, beginning Summer of 2012,” The words jumped out at me. YES! I’m IN!
I read the rest.
Reread it.
One last time to check for errors.
There was no scholarship, no anything. Oh. wait.
Nope, nothing. I received notification via email a few days later that I’d received a $300 book scholarship per semester for being a relative of some person who’d made a large scholarship fund for his descendants. That was good. ‘good’.

You Already Know What I Did

This is the moment where you all already know what happened. “Jacob, you’re such an idiot”, “What were you thinking!” “…” or other thoughts may have passed through your head.
Here’s the kicker, I had a 1/2 tuition scholarship to anywhere in the state because of the New Century Scholarship program, for graduating High School with an Associate Degree from a University. I’d have been PAID to go to UVU.

Mistake is made. BYU was attended. Computer Science studied. After a few years I didn’t like it. It wasn’t my cup of tea. Ended up transferring. Where to?

Back to Utah Valley University, studying Personal Financial Planning, sans scholarship.

Now, Money mistakes are a super common occurence, and there are much bigger mistakes that one can make (I’m talking more than $40,000 decisions). When you make one of those, you’ll know.

Do These 2 Things Before You Choose Your University

1. Know your Major. 

If you haven’t determined your major, how will you know what school is best? BYU had a better computer science program. UVU has a better Financial Planning major. If you still aren’t sure, try going to a community college or other cheaper college. Why pay the price of the expensive colleges when you can get the undergrad cheap at your local community college? It sometimes may make sense to get your associates from a different school before going to the one you’ve chosen to attend for your bachelor’s or higher degree.

If you don’t know which major to choose, or are struggling between a few, Act on THIS article I wrote recently. Basically, its how to get the thoughts and who you are down on paper to make decisions easier and with more knowledge out loud.

2. Know your scholarships. What are the implications of attending your school of choice? How will you pay for it? UVU gave me scholarships, BYU didn’t. Do you have to take on debt, is the cost that significant.

Will your major pay for the cost of going to school?  You need to know How Much Your Degree Makes to consider how much debt you could take on if you don’t have the scholarships.

Here is what I mean: Determine how much income your major going to bring, and how much debt it’ll take. Can that justify the debt you would get from going to the more expensive school? Here are 8 majors that just don’t justify their cost.

What’s your biggest financial mistake you’ve made! Share your confession with me here or tweet it at me @FinancialGinger and I’ll make it into a post you’ll see featured on my twitter and Facebook.

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The Ultimate Cost Saver in College: 4 steps

My father during his last semester of college told my mom, “Wait… I don’t want to major in business. I want to be a chef”.

Needless to say, he didn’t go to chef school. Many of us spend years bouncing around in majors of college and end up with all this needless classwork.

This is the key to saving both Time and Money in college.

Get the Right Major the First Time

This is easier than it sounds. First, you need a vision. If you don’t have one, use this nifty little template. (Jokes, that’s a link to my article about writing a vision statement)

But seriously, the most important thing in deciding your major is knowing who you REALLY are. Who are you? What makes you tick? Figure that out.

Here’s the process:

  1. Lists about you
  2. Interviews
  3. Comparison Charts
  4. Have 1 “figure-it-out” semester

This is the process I used to break into my major quickly. The reason it’s so good in saving you money is because of the time you spend going to college. Sure, earning a couple scholarships for $400 or $500 a piece is great, but if you can go to school for 2 semesters less because you didn’t change a major, then you just saved 2 semesters of tuition which is average about $9-10,000 dollars.

Here is, The Ultimate Cost Saver in College.

Step 1: Lists

List out 20 majors you’re interested in.

List out 20 Jobs you could enjoy doing.

It’s important to get to a larger number, so you really consider things you actually enjoy. Everyone is able to find 3 or 4 things they like, but can you get 20? Narrow it down to a top 5. Maybe a trusted friend, or therapist, or coach, or school counselor could help you narrow the list down a bit.

My Step 1: I was deciding what I wanted to do with my life after finishing a 2 year service mission in New Zealand.  The starting list included skills with dancing (I was a 4th place Titleist in Youth-American-Smooth at BYU Nationals in Ballroom in 2013), a love for computers, good conversational skills (I hope), loving people, loving group interactions, breaking ideas into pieces, loving competition and other factors. It was easy to identify event planning, financial services, and global supply chain management as 3 possible majors, among others.

Step 2: Interviews

Find people in each industry that you know (or don’t!) and interview them. This is cake. Ask people on social media, google companies that work in that industry, it’s not too hard to find someone. Most respectable people will give you 15 minutes to interview them.

You need good questions: Here is a basic list:

What makes your job worth it?

How did you end up working in this industry?

How much do people get paid working in your industry?

How do you help people?

What are the best certifications or skills to learn success?

What personality types work well in this industry?

How do you get into the industry running fast?

Is this a 40 hour a week job? How much time do you need to invest to achieve excellence?

Interviewing  5 people in each industry will give you a good way to benchmark what they enjoy, pros and cons, income levels, what they hate, skills they utilize frequently, career path and progression, and other little details you want to know.

My Step 2: After calling up a few old friends, and posting on Facebook about wanting to talk to professionals in these areas (in separate posts on different days. Posting a list of things on Facebook gets zero responses. and you want more than zero), I was able to interview a few event planners, financial planners, and a few supply chain management experts. The leader of my service mission (over 200+ of us missionaries) was a supply chain expert for UPS during his working days, my old dance partners father is a financial planner, and a man from my church back home is a very successful event planner. This grew into more interviews. My Girlfriend sent me to the finance guy for her company at a local Edward Jones branch. My interviews grew and grew and I really learned the good, the bad, and the ugly of each industry.

Step 3: Compare

If you’ve read many of my articles, you’ve probably seen that I often say “Ask your friend, boss, etc to shorten down this list with you.” or “Ask your friend if that’s really you”.

Same here! Ask people what they think, and maybe make a weighted list or pros and cons for each, then weight how important that is to you. Then you can almost make a weighted average of how important it is.

My Step 3: I didn’t make a weighted list for this (Such a Hypocrite, ae?) but I’ve done this with many projects. Deciding where to spend money, choosing to live at home or live on my own during college, If I should paint my room blue on the top half or blue on the bottom half, and other ‘very important’ decisions, or less important decisions.

 Step 4: It’s okay to have a “Figure-it-out” semester

Maybe it’d be good to take one semester and take 1 or 2 classes in each major you’ve picked. It’s also a great time to talk to counselors and teachers and continue working on clarifying step 3 (compare) and spend more time on step 2 (interviews).

Realize that rushing through college isn’t fun. There are scholarships you can get while in school, there are lots of governmental aid that you can get, and there is college life. Do you really want to be out of school in the big world at 21? Consider studying abroad, finding side hustle opportunities, start a business, do something epic during school time. Summer is the opportunity to work at a hotel in Alaska, work on a fishing boat on the sea, working in hospitality in Australia, or building up certifications, skills, and hobbies that can contribute to your overall balance in life.

Remember,

Lists, Interviews, Comparison tables, and Take a semester to figure it out.

Jacob Johnson

The Financial Ginger

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Guest Writer: The Envelope Budget And Running Away

From guest writer: Flia

Running away taught me a lot. It taught me a lot about trust. It taught me a lot about making my own decisions. It taught me a lot about budgeting my money. It taught me that what might seem like a terrible decision could be the best thing that I’ve ever done for myself.

WAIT! WHAT?

Back up a little bit!

It taught me about budgeting? Believe it or not, yes it did.

And that’s just what I’m here to explain.

I realize that most of you reading this do not know me and so a little background is necessary. Shortly after my 19th birthday, I ran away from home. I am not going to go into details as to why, because that’s not what I’m writing about.

Three days beforehand, I bought a train ticket from Indiana to Utah. That same day, I started cashing out my bank account. My specific bank would only let me withdraw $300 a day. Although you could get around this rule by also using an ATM that was not associated with a bank (such as an ATM at a Wal-Mart).

By the time I got on the train and left Indiana, I had about $1,500 in cash, my backpack, and my duffel bag. And I had a 48 hour train ride to figure out what to do next.

IMG_7481
Forty-Eight hours on a train

About six hours into the trip I was really bored and hanging out in the snack cart where I knew I would be left alone. Because of how bored I was, I was starting to become delusional. That was the point that I decided to budget my money.

It’s not that I’d never done any budgeting before, but all of my previous budgeting had been done on electronic day planners and such. I didn’t have any of that with me so I had to do a little creative thinking.

The first thing I did was brainstorm and write down a list of everything that I would need money for. My list ended up something like this:

  • Travel & Gas (for whoever would be picking me up at the train station)
  • Food (on the train)
  • Food (elsewhere)
  • Lodging (hotel or staying with a friend)
  • Non-Food Necessities (toiletries/clothes/medication)
  • Emergency/Extra

After I had categorized everything, I began to determine about how much (or what percentage) of my money needed to go towards what. Things such as gas money for the friend that picked me up at the station was relatively easy. I looked up the number of miles between his place and the station and back. Then I determined the average miles per gallon on the specific type of truck that he had, and figured in the average price of gas in the area. After I knew how much gas the trip would have taken him, I could effectively reimburse him. All of that math was probably not necessary, but like I said, I was delusional.

Every other category followed similarly.  Food on the train is ridiculously expensive, even the prepackaged snacks. I found the cheapest food with the most nutrients (which was kind of a joke by the way-it is a snack cart-it’s all garbage) and rationed that extremely carefully. Also, because I had spent a majority of my time in the snack cart, I ended up befriending the guy that ran it. He’s a pretty neat guy. And I ended up getting some free snacks out of it too. That was a bonus!

After I had figured out each of the categories and how much money I would allot to each one, I had to figure out how to separate the money physically. It would be much easier to spend responsibly when I could actually have a visual.

NOTE CARDS!

budget20-20istock_000041295790_largeI had a package of note cards in my purse! I never leave home without them. Each budget got one note card. I folded it in half, lined side inward, and on the outside wrote which category it was. The lined inside would serve as a ledger. Every time I spent money from that card, I would subtract the amount that I spent and write in the new total.

And I am not quite sure why I just explained that because you really should already know how to use a ledger.

Any leftover money that did not get spent would go into my Emergency/Extra fund. This money was kept in an entirely separate compartment of my wallet.

flat550x550075f-u1
Out of Sight, Out of Mind

Out of sight, out of mind. It would be used in case of emergency, depleted funds, of on something necessary that I would inevitably forget about. For instance, I had no cell phone. I ended up shelling out a little less than $25 for a burn phone and some minutes.

Although I was not out in Utah very long before continuing on to my next place, I still use this method of budgeting. I get paid through a paycard (a bank less debit card) and cash out 85% of my earnings every payday. Savings go into a tin under my bed (out of sight, out of mind) and everything else is separated into neat little note cards in my wallet.

So yeah, I guess you could say that running away taught me about budgeting.

Thanks to Flia for the guest post! The envelope is a basic budget that really gets stuff done. What do you do to keep track of your money? What is your story?

I always love to hear your money ideas, so email me at [email protected]

Flia is a college student studying forensic biochemistry. She is an avid artist and is currently working on multiple commissioned pieces. Although she is now residing in Kansas, she has lived a little bit of everywhere and isn’t overly attached to one particular place. In her spare time, Flia likes to read, practice new art techniques, and baby-sit for family-friends.

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Seriously, No Credit Score

You’re that one college student. Your parents have the car in your name, you were a part of credit union so you still have joint-access on your bank account, you’ve worked jobs and they all have auto-paid to that account you have. To make matters worse, the background check your college apartment runs turned out with nothing on you, even though you’re twenty-two! You know the manager though and he’s going to be making money off of your and the 4 friends you have coming in to rent this larger apartment out so he lets that slide.

Fact of the matter is: you have zero credit history, and a FICO of Pointer={Null}.

Awkward story. This is Me, and I’m supposedly a student learning about Financial Planning. I can tell you about “Yield” and “Earnings Per Share” in stock markets, I can monologue about knowing when to refinance your home and fun software available to consumers to track your expenses and get on top of your budget. Determining when to file bankruptcy may be out of my league now, but I can certainly help you understand the major considerations to make before filing bankruptcy such as identifying secured debt and reminding you that student loan debt doesn’t leave you if you file bankruptcy.

But. I. Don’t. Even. Have. A. Credit. Score.

What do I do? Well, I’m a man with a plan, and I intend fully to get myself that credit score, dream of 800’s.

Where do I even begin? I know the basics and book learning: Never have more than 15% of your limit on credit cards, don’t pay your bills late,  Have accounts that are older than 10 years, have cycle credit and fixed credit that you pay regularly and on time (I.E. spending on your credit card for bills and paying it off, and having a mortgage or car payment).

But, I’m not starting from 0. I’m not even starting from 300! I’m starting from Value = Null!

Here are some Ideas I’ve heard and read about starting to build a credit score.

  • Get a secured Credit Card
  • Get a Credit-Builder Loan
  • Co-sign for a Credit Card or Loan
  • Become an authorized user on another credit card

I want to know what YOU did. I can do a google search or a www.ninja.com search (ninja’s don’t know anything about building Credit! Trust me, I’ve asked a ninja)

Ask a Ninja.PNG

Now, these ideas are ideas. I want action items. How does one actually accomplish this? Here are my honest thoughts, but to shake it up I’m going backwards, from dumb to least dumb

1.Co-Sign for a Credit Card or Loan –

Unless your parent is highly trusting of you, or intentionally wants to make themselves get in a rough place credit wise themselves if you ever mess up, this sounds like a bad idea. If you are late on a payment or lose your job and can’t pay or a variety of other issues, guess who has to pay? The person who cosigned with you. Maybe not financially and you can pay them back next month with the late fees on top. But it will damage their credit too.

Steps:    a) Go in with the Co-Signer to a credit institution
b) Fill out the application with them and sign their blood to your blood
c) pay on time every time or ruin the relationship with whomever co-signer is

Score on the Can-To-Should-Do scale is Probably-Not : 1/7

2. Get a Secured- Credit Card –

I’ll be honest. I wouldn’t know what this was if I hadn’t asked 3 Certified Financial Planner® (CFP®) Designee’s and a couple of college professors about how to build a credit score and they shared this concept. Secured Cards are designed to build credit, break your way into the system and get that score. However, you have to give them the money equal to the amount you have “On Credit” and it isn’t given back until you’ve paid that amount. The benefits are that your money you are almost loaning from yourself is reported to Credit Bereaus! Really, it just seems like a cheap way, yes there is a fee, to get in on your own. #Independent

Steps:    a) find a secured credit card company, your bank probably has one or NerdWallet.com has reviews on secured credit cards
b) bring in a wad of cash and fill out the application
c) use it: pay tuition, buy noodles and ramen, or deliver your girl some cute flowers.
d) Make sure you set a billion reminders and auto pay to pay that on time! Don’t mess this up, its fool proof. You’re the fool, and the proof is in that you’re paying to use your own money.
e) close the account at the end and you should have credit now.

Score on the Can-To-Should-Do scale is Probably-Should : 6/7

3. Credit-Builder Loan

This is like a normal loan, but you don’t get any of the money from the loan. This forces you to save your money, and the payments get reported, so save on time. Not a bad way to force yourself to start saving! Then at the end, you get your own money back in the new account plus that credit score. Note that these do have fees. It may be good to consider Credit Builder Loans and Secured card loans to see what’s better, though I’d guess secured is better rates because you have to have the money in hand.

Steps:    a) Find your company: credit unions, and online lenders like selflender.com are options
b) link up that auto pay so you don’t hurt yourself, and set reminders!
c) wait a time frame, usually 1 year while making payments
c) get your money and credit score.

Score on the Can-To-Should-Do scale is Probably-Should : 5.5/7

4. Become an authorized user on another person’s card

I bet your parent, or sibling could work for this. If you can pull this off you get all the perks of their spending habits to build your history, but you aren’t legally required to pay for anything they do.  Check with the bank they use and make sure they will report it on your name if you become authorized.

Steps:    a) check that the agency you want to use will report on your record
b) Ensure that the person you want to use is reliable!
c) get your name on that card
d) wait a time frame, probably about a year and check in with them periodically
e) do nothing. You should have a credit score

Score on the Can-To-Should-Do scale is DO-IT-NOW: 8.4/7

 

Now, that you have all these ideas from my mouth. What has worked for YOU! Let’s move from theory to practice. I’m going to open some accounts and get my score moving and I’ll promise you some updates on how it’s working out next week!

Shouldn’t you be getting your score started now? Share your actions with me and join in the Credit Creating Revolution with me.

 

-Jacob Brad Johnson is 22 years old and a student at Utah Valley University (UVU). He is actively pursuing a degree in Personal Financial Planning and intends to prepare for and become a Certified Financial Planner® (CFP®) Designee. He is involved in the Financial Planning Association at UVU and has been an intern at Searcy Financial Services. He’s competed ballroom dance at a national level and yes, he doesn’t have a credit score. Yet!