Professor Laurie Kramer believed a sibling relationship is perceived as being one of the longest relationships someone may have in their lifetime

Professor Laurie Kramer believed a sibling relationship is perceived as being one of the longest relationships someone may have in their lifetime. Professor Kramer believes the influences both positive and negative within sibling relationships form the basis of learning how to identify, express and regulate a wide array of emotions. These interactions help develop informal behaviours by role modelling within social settings outside the home and in establishing long-term social behaviours. Although parents are still a huge influence when teaching social niceties the time spent with siblings represents the majority of a child’s everyday experiences. Some children however may learn undesirable behaviours from older sibling’s antisocial behaviours such as smoking, drinking etc.
Kramer believes the most important thing parents can do is to help foster a supportive relationship between siblings from the very beginning. Developing a positive interaction will help them to value one another and understand that everyone is individual with their own needs, thoughts and feelings. It is acceptable not to agree or share the same opinion but to show mutual respect, cooperation and the ability to conflict manage.