Similarly “Preludes” furthers the concept of alienation through demonstrating the human psyche as inherently corrupt and irredeemable

Similarly “Preludes” furthers the concept of alienation through demonstrating the human psyche as inherently corrupt and irredeemable. Within “Preludes” Eliot generalises the individual by addressing the audience in the second person to communicate his disillusionment of the modern society described within the poem. The use of second person allows for a personal introspection within the audience and myself in regards to the inescapable lonleliness experienced as people and allows for the audience to engage with Eliot’s criticism of the modern world adding towards its ageless appeal. The hyperbole of “the thousand images of which your soul was constituted” imbues a profound revelation of the human psyche as tainted and the degradation of the human spirit is evident as it is now fragmented with each piece a meaningless reflection of the abhorrent landscape it occupies; the very notion of corruption is palpable within the description. Eliot enhances the connection between environment and the human spirit which is “stretched tight across the skies or trampled by insistent feet”. The use of enjambent manifests how the urban landscape diminishes collectively the human spirit which is underneath one’s routine showing that one’s conscience is holistically alienated within a preoccupied society. Eliot exhibits the irredeemability of society as “the world revolve like ancient women gathering fuel in vacant lots”. Eliot reminds us that the notion of time is infinite and so is the ineluctable nature of alienation. Instead Eliot evokes bathos in the audience who are forced to relinquish beliefs of salvation but rather encouraged to accept the jarring inexorability that the human spirit is irreparable. This notion is furthered by the cyclical nature of the Preludes Hence, Eliot explores universal themes of human corruption caused by alienation enhancing the timelessness of the poem.